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Ludovic Séguin

Ludovic Séguin

 

LUDOVIC SEGUIN WITH SYRUP


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Colbran

Colbran

 

JAMES AND MARY COLBRAN.


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Fire Truck

Fire Truck

 

 

FIRE TRUCK AND MAYOR RUNNELLS


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Charlie Wilson, the Great Train robber

Charlie Wilson, the Great Train robber

 

Charlie Wilson, the British Train Robber of 1963, lived in Hudson and Rigaud under the assumed name of Ronald Alloway until he was arrested in February 1968.


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Sep 10, 2007 Meeting: The Great Train Robbery & Hudson

7.30pm St. James Anglican Church, 642 Main Road, Hudson

HUDSON AND AREA: HIDEOUT FOR ONE OF ENGLAND’S GREAT TRAIN ROBBERS

On August 8, 1963 Hudson and area residents picked up the latest edition of the local paper, the Lake of Two Mountains Gazette. Hudson High School graduation results grabbed the headlines, followed by the announcement that Miss R. Mathews was appointed parish assistant to the Parish of Vaudreuil. As a follow-up to the July 18 editorial “Dangerous Weapon,” the paper noted that the weapon, metal fences newly installed around the local post offices, had struck again. A youngster had received a bad gash requiring stitches and another resident had had his slacks ripped. Postmaster L.J. Mullan taped the dangerous edges, and Hudson Heights manager Art Grubert promised he would personally check and re-tape the offending posts until the federal Department of Public Works solved the problem.

Later that day television brought news about the Great Train Robbery in England. Thieves had robbed the Royal Mail Glasgow to London post office train of £2.6 million. Wikipedia estimates that their haul was equivalent to over $80 million today.


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Gobi

Gobi

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An early resident...

 

Bridge over the Vivery stream.Bridge over the Vivery stream.

Hudson's Earliest Residents

by

Maben Walter Poirier


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read more | poirmw's blog

Submitted by poirmw on Sat, 2007-05-19 10:24.

May 14, 2007 Meeting: “Unfree” – Slaves and Captives in Canada

7.30pm St. James Anglican Church, 642 Main Road, Hudson

The Hudson Historical Society presents “Unfree” – Slaves and Captives in Canada on Monday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. at St. James Church Hall, 642 Main Road, Hudson. This will be the last monthly meeting until September. This year the world marks the 200th anniversary of the passing of the “Abolition of the Slave Trade Bill” by the British Parliament. From that time on the slave trade was abolished throughout the Empire. The British navy was authorized to fine ships caught trafficking humans £100 per slave found on board.


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Rencontres sur la rivière des Outaouais

Les relations entre Amérindiens et Européens, aux XVIIe et XIXe siècles

par MARC RIOPEL

La rivière des Outaouais est au coeur de l’histoire que nous allons vous raconter au fil de ce texte. Formée à la suite du retrait du glacier sur le territoire du nord-est de l’Amérique du Nord, il y a environ 12 000 ans, la rivière des Outaouais s’impose rapidement comme voie de communication centrale qui permet l’accès à l’ensemble du Canada. Ainsi, en suivant son cours, le canotier peut atteindre l’intérieur du territoire du Québec par le biais de ses tributaires, se rendre vers la baie d’Hudson ou encore poursuivre sa route vers les Grands Lacs et l’Ouest du Canada. Les Amérindiens ont rapidement découvert son potentiel et en ont fait un réseau de communication et d’échanges réunissant les tribus amérindiennes de l’ensemble du continent. Cela s’est mis en place, il y a environ 5 000 ans. C’est d’ailleurs ce réseau de communication qui permet la rencontre des Européens et des Amérindiens, au début du XVIIe siècle, objet central de cette histoire.

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13 Nov 2006 Meeting - Military Historian Sheds Light on Canadian Soldiers in Siberia

Monday November 13, 7.30pm at St. James Anglican Church, 642 Main Road, Hudson

The Siberian Expeditionary Force: A (Nearly) Forgotten Episode of WWI Long-time residents of Hudson remember Frank Wilson. Born in 1890, the youngest of James and Carolyn Wilson of Cote St. Charles' nine children, Frank was one of the large contingent of local men who answered the call to defend King and Empire in the Great War. He survived, returned to the Cote, but soon left for Ottawa where he learned the trade of carpentry. Two decades of work in Detroit followed.


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